Caitlyn Antrim

Executive Director

Rule of Law Committee for the Oceans

 

 

 

 

 

Bio

Caitlyn Antrim is the Executive Director of the Rule of Law Committee for the Oceans, a committee of experts in international law and policy for the oceans. On behalf of the Committee, she provides education and outreach regarding the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and the benefits of US accession to the Convention to US and global interests.

Ms. Antrim focuses on national and international issues related to oceanic, continental and polar resources and to the national and international regimes that affect their development and conservation. She was an guest expert to the president of the UN Conference on Environment and Development and founder of the Delegates Computer Information Center of the International Negotiating Committee on Drought and Desertification. She served as a Deputy US Representative to the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea, Senior Analyst and Project Director at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, Policy Analyst in the US Department of Commerce and an officer in the US Navy. She has directed major projects for the American Academy of Diplomacy and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and served as a Project Officer at the National Academy of Sciences.

Ms. Antrim has given presentations on the Arctic in an age of climate change to the Naval War College, the Geospatial Intelligence Agency, the American Branch of the International Law Association, and to think tanks and universities. Her publication topics range from resource, economic and policy assessments of minerals on land and on the deep ocean floor to the theory of international regimes and international systems for dispute settlement.  Her most recent publications address the geopolitics of a changing arctic, particularly the effects of a more accessible arctic watershed on Russia’s role in the world.

Antrim conducted her undergraduate and graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she earned her BS in Mechanical Engineering and the professional degree of Environmental Engineer with her graduate research on the technology, economics, law and policy affecting the development of the deep seabed mining industry. In addition to her academic credentials, she was designated a Distinguished Naval Graduate by the US Navy for her work in the NROTC programs at MIT and Harvard University.