The Bridge: Connecting Science and Policy

Participate in the Science Policy Conference from Wherever You Are

  Can’t make it to the 2013 AGU Science Policy Conference, but dying to see the plenary sessions featuring Bart Gordon, Cora Marrett, James Balog, and Richard Harris? AGU is excited to present both plenary sessions as live webcast during the conference. A link will be made available on the webcast website as the sessions […]

Unwind and Network after a Full Day at the Science Policy Conference

Following a full day of events on Tuesday, 25 June 2013 at the Science Policy Conference, there will be a reception on Capitol Hill, in B339-B340 Rayburn House Office Building, with opportunities for networking and refreshments. Recap the topics of the day with other conference participants. The reception will be open to conference attendees and […]

Why I’m Attending the AGU Science Policy Conference

The first question I am often asked when policymakers find out I am a geoscientist is “What do you think of fracking?” As a geodynamicist whose research focuses on subduction zones, this topic is clearly outside my specialized field of knowledge. Nevertheless, as a member of the geologic community my credentials lend extra weight to […]

Swimming in Unfavorable Conditions

  With over 70% of the world covered by water, understanding the interaction between humans and the ocean is vital to the health of both.  The world’s ocean helps to feed communities, regulate climate, support tourism and economies, and generate oxygen that humans breathe, and provides innumerable benefits to the livelihood and health of the […]

Asteroids and Tsunamis and Space Weather, Oh My!

What are the odds that tomorrow you walk out of your home to see a meteor burning up in Earth’s atmosphere as it hurtles toward our planet at breakneck speed? Luckily, chances are pretty low. But, as evidenced by the recent large fireball – or “superbolide” if you speak Astrophysics – seen by many (and […]

Risky Business

  We only have to turn on the news to see the need for better risk reduction in the United States and worldwide. Recent tornadoes in Oklahoma have killed dozens, and many people across the country were surprised to learn that sometimes local policy does not require tornado shelters in areas known for tornado outbreaks. […]

Global Warming: Public Opinion and Policy

  As a research scientist in Carnegie Mellon University’s interdisciplinary department of Engineering and Public Policy, I field a lot of questions. Perhaps the toughest of those is “How can you sleep at night, when you know your research is influencing policy?  We’re scientists, not advocates!”  Well, shall we pause a moment to consider how […]

The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges to Meet Growing Demands

Water and energy are linked resources in ever-increasing demand in the United States.  Energy production requires an abundant, reliable, and predictable source of water, a resource that is unfortunately in short supply already throughout large portions of the U.S.  Additionally, developing water supplies can require large amounts of energy to extract, transport, treat, and distribute.  […]

Complex Science and Policy Challenges in U.S. Onshore and Offshore Energy

Historically, the challenges associated with energy were almost purely scientific and technological. Incredible advancements in energy for industrial, residential, and transportation uses revolutionized the U.S. standard of living, but the energy challenges have grown exponentially more complex in that time. For example, the modern-day version of oil drilling began in 1859 in the United States. […]

Melting Ice and Burning Questions for the Future

  As the climate changes, so do the impacts on society and the way we prepare for things such as severe weather, rising seas, droughts and wildfires, changing ecosystems, and melting glaciers. Looking at the world through the eye of a camera lens is one way that James Balog has been witnessing the impacts of […]